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'Obi-Novot' Melon
'Obi-Novot' Melon
'Obi-Novot' Melon
'Obi-Novot' Melon
'Obi-Novot' Melon
'Obi-Novot' Melon

'Obi-Novot' Melon

Regular price $3.75 Sale

Cucumis melo subsp. melo

Origin: Samarqand, Uzbekistan

Improvement status: Landrace

Seeds per packet: ~12

Germination tested 12/2023: 96%

Life cycle: Annual

The best melons in the world come from Central Asia, and this Uzbek landrace is a prime example of their excellence. The name means "father of sugar," and the sweet melting flesh and honeyed aroma make clear why it was given this name. Obi-Novot makes us believe the insipid honeydews and cantaloupes found in American markets don't even deserve to be called melons!

Obi-Novot is believed to have originated in the Samarqand area, one of the most important urban centers along the old Silk Road, but it is now grown in Bukhara, Surkhandarya, and the Fargana Valley. It is also grown in small numbers in Russia and California, but it has resisted most attempts at large scale cultivation because its soft flesh makes it highly perishable. This aspect of its character presents no problem for the home gardener though, since it can be enjoyed right out of hand after harvest. The melons are medium-sized and have a very striking appearance, dappled and striped green, orange, and yellow, with a round protrusion on the blossom end. The flesh is very pale green or yellow and the seed cavity is small.

We got our stock seed from the late Steve Facciola, author of Cornucopia and Cornucopia II, before he passed in the summer of 2020. This seed was grown by our friends Mud Forte and Harry Matthews in Sicklerville, NJ, who told us they've never tasted a better melon!

GROWING TIPS: Direct sow in rich soil and full sun after all danger of frost has passed. In short-season regions, you may start them indoors a couple weeks before last frost date. Give the plants plenty of room to sprawl and keep well fertilized (such as with worm castings or compost tea).